Wrapping up version one: Structured Data on Commons

As the three-year grant period for building Structured Data on Commons (SDC) comes to a close with the end of 2019, I’d like to share some lists of the past two year’s worth of planning, discussion, building, testing, and releases the team has done with the Commons community.

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Data Roundtripping: a new frontier for GLAM-Wiki collaborations

Dancers around the may pole, Oxford, Ohio, 1926. Photo by Frank R. Snyder; Miami University Libraries—Digital collections, no known copyright restrictions

For more than 10 years now, cultural institutions around the world have partnered with Wikimedians to make their collections more visible and to encourage re-use via Wikimedia platforms. Collaborations of this kind, GLAM-Wiki projects (with Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums), often use Wikipedia and Wikimedia Commons as platforms. Images of cultural collections are uploaded to Wikimedia’s media repository Wikimedia Commons and are re-used as illustrations in Wikipedia articles.

For several years, a growing number of GLAM-Wiki partnerships also work with Wikidata, the free, multilingual knowledge base of the Wikimedia ecosystem. Cultural institutions and Wikimedians upload data about cultural collections to Wikidata: it provides an accessible way to publish collections data as Linked Open Data, and makes the collection data multilingual, re-usable and discoverable across the web. Since 2019, files on Wikimedia Commons can now also be described with multilingual structured data from Wikidata. This will make the (structured) data component of GLAM-Wiki collaborations even more prominent in the future.

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Lua support for Structured Data on Commons – pulling data into templates

As the first round of building structured data content for Wikimedia Commons comes to a close, support for the Lua programming language brings structured data front-and-center to file pages.

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How can Structured Data on Commons, Wikidata, and Wikisource walk hand in hand? A pilot project with Punjabi Qisse

Punjabi Qisse; Puran Bhagat, Sassi Punnu, Raja Mor Dhuj, Kehar Singh Maut and others. CC BY-SA 4.0 by Satdeep Gill
Selection of books to be digitized, described and transcribed as a part of the SDC pilot project. (ImageSatdeep GillCC BY-SA 4.0)
logo Wikisource
The Wikisource logo by Nicholas Moreau, CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported

I work as a part of the Community Programs (GLAM) team at the Wikimedia Foundation. As part of my work, I support Wikisource, a digital library of public domain and freely licensed texts, which is an important platform for GLAM projects and knowledge exchange in many Wikimedia communities. I have been writing case studies about Wikisource, documenting pain points around it, and prioritizing them with the communities.

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How we helped a small art museum to increase the impact of its collections, with Wikimedia projects and structured data

A blog post by Sandra Fauconnier, with contributions by Sam Donvil (PACKED) and Joris Van Donink (Jakob Smitsmuseum). This blog post describes a GLAM pilot project for Structured Data on Wikimedia Commons, executed by PACKED, and mentored by Sandra. We hope this will inform and inspire Wikimedians who want to learn about structured data, and/or (intend to) do similar GLAM-Wiki collaborations!

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Introducing ISA – a cool tool for adding structured data on Commons

The ISA tool being announced at WikiData Conference 2019 as the coolest multimedia tool of the year by Liam Wyatt (User:Wittylama). Photo: User:Sandra Fauconnier

ISA is a new tool that makes it very easy for anyone, including absolute beginners, to add structured data descriptions in the form of captions and so-called ‘Depicts’ statements to images on Wikimedia Commons. ISA is called a ‘micro-contributions’ tool: when you use ISA, you make many very small edits to Wikimedia Commons in a playful way. We intentionally designed ISA to be multilingual and mobile-first; it has been such a hit that it received a WikidataCon 2019 Award in the Multimedia category last October. And why this name? ‘Isa’ is the chiShona language word for ‘put’ or ‘place’, but it was also chosen because it is an acronym for Information Structured Acceleration or Information Structured Additions.

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On being a bad friend & uploading photos to Commons

The late 19th century was the golden age of Scandinavian painting. Among the most famous were the Skagen painters: mainly Danish artists gathered in Skagen in northern Denmark, drawn by the summer light. They painted local fishermen, the scenery and – famously – themselves. It’s a very human and endearing trait. We create our tribes and we celebrate them. We want our fleeting connections memorialized. See the category Wikimedia conventions on Commons: its subcategories have thousands of photos of maybe questionable educational value. But they depict us. Not as disconnected individuals but in the context of our tribe of information gatherers and knowledge disseminators. To us, that has a value.

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