Lists in the Wikimedia movement Part 2: Building manual lists using the editorial practices of the Community

If you haven’t already read it yet, this is the second in a series of three blog posts about the creation of lists in the Wikimedia Movement. Check out part one “Lists in the Wikimedia movement? Why? What?

In the last post, I described why communities create lists, and with the next three posts I am going to describe what kinds of lists are common amongst Wikimedia communities so that you can choose which tactic to use to make your own.

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The Wikipedia Library Books & Bytes for September-October 2019

Issue 36, September–October 2019

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In this issue we highlight #1Lib1Ref, global developments and, as always, a roundup of news and community items related to libraries and digital knowledge.

#1Lib1Ref

Join us again in 2020 for #1Lib1Ref from January 15th to February 5th and don’t forget to bring your friends! #1Lib1Ref is a time that we work together around the world to make Wikipedia more reliable. You can participate in #1Lib1Ref by simply adding a citation to Wikipedia’s content! All we ask and imagine: a world in which every librarian (or archivist, reference professional, and scholar) adds 1 more reference to Wikipedia. This is the fifth year of the #1Lib1Ref campaign and we couldn’t be more excited to support another year of activities.

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Lists in the Wikimedia movement? Why? What?

This is the first part in an ongoing series on the function and value of lists in the Wikimedia moment by Alex Stinson.

Successful editathons, campaigns, contests and projects within the Wikimedia movement often start with a list: something to engage, focus and build attention for participants in the activity. Almost every topic area benefits from a list: the Gender Gap (Women in Red or Art and Feminism), other underrepresented knowledge projects (Black Lunch Table or Afrocine), complete sets of knowledge identified by experts (i.e missing butterflies) as well as common topics on Wikimedia projects (like WikiProject Military History’s coverage of destroyers in Majestic Titans). 

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What we learned from 1Lib1Ref 2019

Giselle Bordoy (WMAR) CC BY-SA 4.0

Each year people from around the world join the #1Lib1Ref initiative to make small but meaningful contributions to Wikipedia.

The Wikipedia community has developed a core strategy to ensure the quality of information in its articles: including footnotes to reliable sources to allow readers to “verify” the information. The 1Lib1Ref campaign calls on contributors to add just one footnote to help improve the verifiability of Wikipedia. In addition, this campaign introduces new editors to the projects via a simple entry point.

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